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The Surprising Evolution of Dinosaur Drawings |The Atlantic

Asher Elbein describes the differing approaches to paleoart since the 1800s by focusing on two recently published paleoart books: Taschen's Paleoart: Visions of the Prehistoric Past by Zoe Lescaze and Titan Books' Dinosaur Art II: The Cutting Edge of Paleoart by Steve White. Links to works of featured paleoartists are included in the article.

 

How Do You Figure Out How #Dinosaurs Walked? | @scifri @MrKosko | 6-8 #science #lesson #anatomy #fossils

An education resource from Science Friday that covers: birds and dinosaur comparisons, phylogenetics, modeling leg movement with materials and analysis, pelvic shape and walking gait, and making and videotaping a puppet that moves like a theropod. Supporting NGSS standards, charts and worksheets are provided.

Utah #Paleontologists Turn to #Crowdfunding for #Raptor Project | @nytimes | @UtahraptorTrap

A New York Time's article by Asher Elbein describing Utahraptor and the history of a 2001 find leading to a GoFundMe project to help prepare a nine ton block that contains skeletons of a herbivorous dinosaur, a 16 foot adult Utahraptor, four jueveniles, and a hatchling.

All the #Dinosaurs You Love Were Created by #Artists | @Crixeo | #paleoart

Katherine DM Clover (@Postnuc_mama) describes the influence of paleoartists visual representations of prehistoric creatures on culture through examples of Charles Knight, Gregory Paul and their present-day collaboration with paleontologists.

New scientific data, and fresh interpretations of old data, can lead to massive shifts in our understanding of the past.

The man who brought #dinosaurs to #MN to retire at 86 | @kare11

A newscast video and accompanying article with additional images recognizing the career of paleontologist Bruce Erickson for 58 year career with the Science Museum of Minnesota.

#Paleoart: the strange history of #dinosaurs in #art – in pictures | @guardian

A series of eight classic examples of paleoart from 1853 to 1990 from Taschen's new paleoart book, Paleoart: Visions of the Prehistoric Past by writer Zoe Lescaze and artist Walton Ford.

 

Contested National Monuments in Utah House Treasure Troves of Fossils | Inside Science | #BearsEars #fossils

A story on paleontology in Utah's big national monuments--Alan Titus's work in Grand Staircase-Escalante NM with possible implications for new Bears Ears NM. Twenty years as a NM, Grand Staircase-Escalante has yielded 12 named dinosaurs, 5 named marine reptiles, 15 species yet to be described, a possible new ecosystem for Laramidia during the Cretaceous, and current work on three tyrannosaurs. For Bears Ears NM the potential is for the continued discovery of earlier organisms (crocodiles, tetrapods), according to Rob Gray, including how life responded just after the Permian-Triassic extinction. Also, a sidebar on looting and destruction of fossil sites.

The Mystery of the Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Death Trap by @SciShow | #dinosaur #mystery

1 min read

Hank Green and team share the findings of the recent CLDQ study by Peterson et al. for the first half of this week's SciShow (4:49). The last half is on the tubelip wrasse, a mucus-drenched fish.

Mystery of Cleveland Dinosaur Graveyard Finally Solved by Scientists | #dinosaurs #mystery @BLMNational

“We are finding some consensus among the many hypotheses surrounding CLDQ,” says study author Jonathan Warnock, from the Indiana University of Pennsylvania. The PeerJ article may be found at: https://peerj.com/articles/3368/ A blog summary of the study's findings and new explanation can be found at: http://blog.everythingdinosaur.co.uk/blog/_archives/2017/06/09/the-mystery-of-the-cleveland-lloyd-dinosaur-quarry.html

Update (6/21): Bran Switek shares the findings in his Laelops post, "The Making of an Allosaurus Graveyard."

Additional take on the Newsweek article by Randall Irmis of the Natural History Museum of Utah is provided at "Science Beyound the Headlines." In it, Randall Irmis shares the importance of working with multiple hypotheses at the 150 million year old mystery of the Cleveland Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry and that there is no need to revise NHMU's exhibit on the CLDQ.