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The #extinction that never happened (video) | @EonsShow | #paleo #video

1 min read

From PBS Digital Studios this PBS Eons 8:30 video covers what scientists call the Lazarus taxa. These group of animals seem to "cheat death" by eluding our detection after their presumed extinction.

Contested National Monuments in Utah House Treasure Troves of Fossils | Inside Science | #BearsEars #fossils

A story on paleontology in Utah's big national monuments--Alan Titus's work in Grand Staircase-Escalante NM with possible implications for new Bears Ears NM. Twenty years as a NM, Grand Staircase-Escalante has yielded 12 named dinosaurs, 5 named marine reptiles, 15 species yet to be described, a possible new ecosystem for Laramidia during the Cretaceous, and current work on three tyrannosaurs. For Bears Ears NM the potential is for the continued discovery of earlier organisms (crocodiles, tetrapods), according to Rob Gray, including how life responded just after the Permian-Triassic extinction. Also, a sidebar on looting and destruction of fossil sites.

The End of the #Dinosaurs: How Luis and Walter Alvarez Uncovered the Catastrophic #Event Responsible | #extinction

A Nautilus article by Sean Carroll about the 66 mya mass extinction event and the evidence for the Alvarez theory and K-T boundary. The HHMI documentary, "The Day the Mesozoic Died," is embedded in the article along with images and graphics.

Asteroids and volcanoes: Both may have caused the #dinosaurs #extinction | @BadAstronomer

Phil Plait outlines a theory that suggests there was more than an asteroid that was responsible for the demise of the dinosaurs.

12 Ancient Giants (And 1 Modern Marvel) | NPR's Skunk Bear | #PaleoLife

1 min read

Meet some real ancient giants and their modern relatives in rhyming verse in this 3:03 video by Adam Cole. He provides an infographic, illustrated by Mary McLain (@marycmclain), on his NPR Skunk Bear tumbr site (@NPRSkunkBear) and describes it as:

Earth’s ancient history is full of giant versions of modern animals. Evolutionary forces (competition for resources, changes in climate) pushed these species to become incredibly large. And I’m not just talking about giant dinosaurs - there were huge mammals and marsupials too. 

A lot of these giants lived in the Pleistocene, an epoch stretching from around 2.5 million to 11,000 years ago. Mysteriously, the extinction of many of these animals coincides with humanity’s arrival as a dominant predator.