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What Dives #PlateTectonics? | new #animation #video by @IRIS_EPO

1 min read

Lithospheric plates are part of a planetary scale thermal convection system. The energy source for plate tectonics is Earth’s internal heat while the forces moving the plates are the “ridge push” and “slab pull” gravity forces. (6:53 video)

Trumps's national monuments decision could impact dinosaur fossil sites | CBS This Morning

1 min read

The future of 21 national monuments is under federal review, as President Trump is expected to significantly downgrade some of them in size and scope. Many scientists worry the move could damage one of the richest deposits of dinosaur bones in the world. Mireya Villarreal went on a dig to see the concerns firsthand (4:05 video).

Marie Tharp: Uncovering the Secrets of the Ocean Floor - with Helen Czerski | The Royal Institution

1 min read

 Continental drift is common knowledge now, but when the idea was first proposed it was revolutionary. Helen Czerski tells the story of how the maps of one of history's finest cartographers shifted our view of the planet (4:32 video). 

The #extinction that never happened (video) | @EonsShow | #paleo #video

1 min read

From PBS Digital Studios this PBS Eons 8:30 video covers what scientists call the Lazarus taxa. These group of animals seem to "cheat death" by eluding our detection after their presumed extinction.

Are there total #solareclipses elsewhere in the #SolarSystem? | @thephysicsgirl | #Mars #Jupiter #Saturn #Pluto

1 min read

Do the moons of Mars or the moons of Jupiter or moons of Pluto cause a total solar eciipse for those planets? What about the rings of Saturn? Watch this 5:04 video by Dianna Cowern or the Physics Girl to find out.

Flume – Low head dam installation effects on coarse sediment transport | SERC media

Geomorpholgy of a river: What happens when you install a dam and how the sediment transport changes.

How a #SolarEclipse Happens | #K12 #visualization

1 min read

You might think that an eclipse should happen every month since the Moon's orbit, depending on how its defined is between 27 and 29 days long. But our Moon's orbit is tilted with respect to Earth's orbit around the Sun by about five degrees. So, sometimes the Moon's shadow misses too high and someimes too low to cause a solar eclipse. Only when the Sun, Moon and Earth line up close to the "lines of node," the imaginary line that represents the intersection of the orbital planes of the Moon and Earth, can you have an eclipse.

For more on how an eclipse works and different types of eclipses, visit NASA's ECLIPSE 101 page, part of their Eclipse2017 site.

NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center provided this (0:45) video.